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« Philosophy of Bias in Philosophy of Law | Main | Us Versus Them: Left and Right Become Confused in Our Age »
Thursday
Aug162018

Introducing Pastology in Philosophy of Law

I have a new paper out in legal theory. It concerns my first book.

https://ssrn.com/abstract=3232204

Abstract: Scholars of legal theory must stop using the phrase “original meaning” when suggesting how we should read undefined legal text. Instead, the term “pastology” or “pastological exegesis” should be used. We have an obligation not to mislead our audience. Whenever legal text is undefined and an advocate puts forth a candidate for more specific meaning based upon a marshaling of the past (floor speeches, letters, old dictionaries, etc.), this is an exegetical behavior known in philosophy of law as pastology.

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